OUTBREAK, DISEASE DETECTIVES AT WORK, epidemiology.  Published by Lerner Publishing Co., Minneapolis, MN in 2000, updated and reissued 2003

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"Mark Friedlander presents a fast-paced, easy-to-read, well-illustrated introduction to the history, basic techniques, and importance of epidemiology.  With an attention-getting summary case study  about 'Blue Men' leading into a short chapter that defines and outlines the history of the field, the author takes the reader from the early work of John Snow and the London Cholera Epidemic in the 1800s through historical epidemics, contemporary problems, and the ongoing battles.  Throughout these pages the importance of teamwork in epidemiological investigations is evident as are the methodical data mining and careful microbiological research techniques required."

       - NSTA Recommends Website

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"A balanced mix of history, science, and anecdote introduces the major epidemics of the past (plague, smallpox), then explains how epidemiology evolved to produce the methods and tools that research centers like the CDC and World Health Organization use in fighting modern epidemics (Ebola, AIDS)>"

      - The Horn Book Guide, January-June 2000

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"...Overall, the book is well organized and presented clearly; it should be valuable as a supplementary reference for the upper intermediate grades and middle school students."

        - SB&F, January-February 2001, Junior High and Young Adult Books

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"This is an update of a title originally published in 2000...This is a readable, intriguing overview of the destructive power of epidemics and the critical work  of public health professionals...A useful and timely addition to any collection"

- School Library Journal, March 2003.

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"This delightful book summarized the best known successes of epidemiology, including the treatment of bubonic plague, smallpox, malaria, influenza, Legionnaire's disease, AIDS, Lyme disease, and the Muerto Canyon (hanta) virus...The special chapter on bio-terrorism contrasts the variety of possible agents (anthrax, smallpox, botulism, tularemia, bubonic plague, and viral hemorrhagic fevers) in a straightforward and matter-of-fact style..."

               - Science Books and Films, May/June 2003